Death with Dignity

Replied by ScienceChic on topic Death with Dignity

Not so fast, this was rated False by Snopes.
Did Canada Legalize Euthanasia So Parents Can Kill Children With Disabilities?
Misleading articles citing an opinion piece falsely claim that Canada has given a "green light" for parents to "kill disabled children".

On 22 November 2017, the web sites Neon Nettle and YourNewsWire.com (among others) published reports about euthanasia and pediatric patients in Canada, claiming that “a controversial new law” now allows parents to end the lives of children with disabilities:

Neither site referenced any news reports to support the claims, linking instead to a 26 October 2017 National Review Online speculative editorial: “Canada Child Euthanasia: A Matter of Time?” That opinion piece speculated that legal euthanasia in Canada could eventually be available to minors:

The “controversial new law” passed in June 2016, not November 2017. Further, that law specifically prohibits even “mature minors” (much less parents) the ability to choose medically assisted death, and it is not by even the most creative interpretation a free pass to euthanize children.

www.justice.gc.ca/eng/cj-jp/ad-am/faq.html

Bill C-14, legislation on medical assistance in dying, received royal assent on June 17, 2016. For more information, visit canada.ca/health

The following is a list of questions and answers related to the proposed medical assistance in dying legislation.


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euthanasia_in_Canada#Bill_C-14
The hope of a secure and livable world lies with disciplined nonconformists who are dedicated to justice, peace and brotherhood. ~Martin Luther King, Jr.

The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it. ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is. ~Winston Churchill

Your scars exist, but it’s your courage that defines you. ~Nalini Singh
02 Aug 2018 10:20 #31

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Replied by ScienceChic on topic Death with Dignity

Did you see this?

Proper palliative care makes assisted dying unnecessary
The experience from Belgium suggests that euthanasia can have unexpected consequences for a patient’s autonomy, writes Benoit Beuselinck
Aug 24th 2018

SINCE 2002 Belgium has been one of the very few countries in the world in which doctors can perform euthanasia. Patients need to be in a hopeless state of constant and unbearable physical or mental pain that cannot be alleviated, or suffering as a result of a serious and incurable disorder caused by an accident or illness.

The main motivation for the change in the law was to give doctors the possibility to relieve physical symptoms such as pain, suffocation or anxiety in terminal disease. However, euthanasia is now applied in patients with longer life expectancy who are not suffering unbearable physical symptoms but experiencing a lack of meaning in life and limitations in their activities: for instance in chronic neurodegenerative or psychiatric diseases such as dementia, autism or depression.

This article is part of a series of viewpoints on assisted dying. Read more here:
The case for and against assisted dying
Why, as part of our Open Future initiative, The Economist has asked proponents and opponents of assisted dying to write for us
Aug 20th 2018
by E.H.

LITTLE doubt exists as to where The Economist stands on assisted dying. In 2015 we ran a cover calling for laws to be changed in Britain and elsewhere to allow doctors to help the terminally ill and the suffering to choose when they die.

But as part of our Open Future initiative—in which, for our 175th anniversary, we aim to remake the case for liberalism—we wanted to open up the conversation to both sides, in the spirit of respectful debate.

Articles:
  • Steven Fletcher: Dying with dignity is the biggest shift in morality in a generation
  • Emilie Yerby: Guernsey was right to reject assisted dying
  • Ellen Wiebe: Doctors should ensure their patients have a good death
  • Charles Falconer: The law on assisted dying in Britain is incoherent and hypocritical
  • Ilora Finlay: Fear of dying should not lead to dangerous legal changes
  • Bernhard Sutter: Patients should have the right to assisted dying
  • Kevin Yuill: Liberals and atheists can also oppose assisted dying
  • Michael Irwin: A doctor-assisted suicide is a human right and a relief for many
  • Peter Saunders: Assisted dying is simply another form of euthanasia
  • Benoit Beuselinck: Proper palliative care makes assisted dying unnecessary
  • Anonymous: Patients alone have the right to decide whether to end their lives
  • Trista Carey: Assisted dying is the natural extension of pro-choice beliefs
  • Dignitas: Access to end-of-life options improves public health
  • Raphael Cohen-Almagor: Patients should be allowed to die at home, surrounded by family and friends
  • Emilie Yerby: Assisted dying would be damaging to those whose choices are not simple
  • Ellen Wiebe: Canada’s example of assisted dying refutes those who argue against it
  • Kevin Yuill: The case for assisted dying is still inherently flawed
  • Trista Carey: Fears of undignified or painful deaths are nothing new
  • Steven Fletcher: Assisted dying legislation is part of a modern, healthy democracy
  • James Mildred: The slippery slope of assisted dying is real
The hope of a secure and livable world lies with disciplined nonconformists who are dedicated to justice, peace and brotherhood. ~Martin Luther King, Jr.

The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it. ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is. ~Winston Churchill

Your scars exist, but it’s your courage that defines you. ~Nalini Singh
29 Aug 2018 21:39 #32

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Replied by ramage on topic Death with Dignity

"Altogether, well over a quarter of all deaths in 2017 in the Netherlands were induced."

Death on demand: has euthanasia gone too far? Countries around the world are making it easier to choose the time and manner of your death. But doctors in the world’s euthanasia capital are starting to worry about the consequences. By Christopher de Bellaigue
theguardian.com Jan 22, 2019
22 Jan 2019 07:42 #33

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Replied by homeagain on topic Death with Dignity

ramage wrote: "Altogether, well over a quarter of all deaths in 2017 in the Netherlands were induced."

Death on demand: has euthanasia gone too far? Countries around the world are making it easier to choose the time and manner of your death. But doctors in the world’s euthanasia capital are starting to worry about the consequences. By Christopher de Bellaigue
theguardian.com Jan 22, 2019


As an active member of Compassion and Choices (for several years now), I would like to correct your terminology. It is MEDICAL AID IN DYING (MAID)…...and it is a choice that an individual faces at the end of their life. When a medical condition is irreversible and death is the prognosis, I ADVOCATE to graciously go on my OWN TERMS. It is my body and my choice to exit in a manner that is peaceful and pain free. I never understood WHY
we elect to do this for our beloved fur babies, but not for our human loved ones. IT is legal
in Colorado and it has been an uphill, unnecessary struggle to find the medical assistance,
when YOUR RIGHT to exercise this exit has been passed into law.
22 Jan 2019 09:06 #34

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Replied by ScienceChic on topic Death with Dignity

Link to the article, if any of you are interested in reading it: www.theguardian.com/news/2019/jan/18/dea...lands-assisted-dying

Ramage, I believe that the 25% induced deaths includes suicides (not physician-assisted) and those under palliative sedation (those who didn't necessarily request to have their life ended but in treating the pain from their disease by placing them in an unconscious state, the simply passed away). This is the paragraph from which that quote originated, providing more context:

As people got used to the new law, the number of Dutch people being euthanised began to rise sharply, from under 2,000 in 2007 to almost 6,600 in 2017. (Around the same number are estimated to have had their euthanasia request turned down as not conforming with the legal requirements.) Also in 2017, some 1,900 Dutch people killed themselves, while the number of people who died under palliative sedation – in theory, succumbing to their illness while cocooned from physical discomfort, but in practice often dying of dehydration while unconscious – hit an astonishing 32,000. Altogether, well over a quarter of all deaths in 2017 in the Netherlands were induced.


What I see as encouraging is that each case is considered carefully based on the circumstances regarding that situation and regional boards "review every act of euthanasia and hand cases over to prosecutors if irregularities are detected. (Each review board is composed of a lawyer, a doctor and an ethicist.)"

I believe people should have a right to choose if they wish to end their own life. Since there is no going back, it shouldn't be done lightly, and in ideal circumstances it involves immediate family and their doctors who come to a consensus, but that won't always be the case and each situation requires independent review.
The hope of a secure and livable world lies with disciplined nonconformists who are dedicated to justice, peace and brotherhood. ~Martin Luther King, Jr.

The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it. ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is. ~Winston Churchill

Your scars exist, but it’s your courage that defines you. ~Nalini Singh
22 Jan 2019 09:47 #35

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Replied by ramage on topic Death with Dignity

Elsevier
The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Volume 38, Issue 2, February 2019, Pages 111-113
The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
PERSPECTIVE
Euthanasia through living organ donation: Ethical, legal, and medical challenges
Author links open overlay panelJan A.M.BollenLLM, MDaDavidShawPhDbGuidode WertPhDcRankieten HoopenLLM, PhDdDirkYsebaertMD, PhDeErnstvan HeurnMD, PhDfWalther N.K.A.van MookMD, PhDa
Show more
doi.org/10.1016/j.healun.2018.07.014Get rights and content
Euthanasia is categorically prohibited in almost all countries throughout the world. In Belgium and the Netherlands, combining euthanasia and subsequent organ donation in a so-called donation after circulatory-death (DCD) procedure is feasible on legal and medical grounds, and is increasingly gaining social and ethical acceptance. However, heart transplantation after DCD is currently not performed in Belgium and the Netherlands after euthanasia due to concerns surrounding the prolonged warm ischemia time associated with DCD and its effect on subsequent heart function. A number of patients who undergo euthanasia explicitly express their wish to donate their organs in a “living organ donation” procedure, which then causes death. Assuming that euthanasia is permitted, as expressed in Dutch and Belgian legislation, this exploratory article addresses whether it is legally and ethically sound to donate organs, especially the heart, as a living donor and to perform euthanasia in the same procedure in a patient who fulfills the due diligence requirements for euthanasia. Organ donation euthanasia (ODE) would then cause death by the associated surgical procedure, and in addition would improve the quality of the other donated organs, a procedure that would fully respect the patient's autonomy.

WOW!
29 Jan 2019 11:42 #36

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Replied by ramage on topic Death with Dignity

FYI The American Spectator 1/30/2019
Special Report
A Scourge of Death Doctors
WESLEY J. SMITHPrint Friendly and PDF
January 30, 2019, 12:05 am

Jack Kevorkian has his unworthy successors.
"Assisted suicide sure brings out the medical bottom feeders. Jack Kevorkian was the most notorious of these — let’s call them “death doctors” — assisting the suicides of some 130 people during the 1990s. Not only did he help sick, disabled, and (at least 5) healthy despairing people kill themselves, but he did it in a particularly crass fashion, such as having them inhale carbon monoxide from a canister in the back of his old, rusty van.

As a pathologist, Kevorkian did not treat living patients after medical school and was thus hardly qualified to medically counsel the many sad people who sought him out. (One wag, whose name escapes me now, quipped that Kevorkian was the most successful serial killer in history because victims came to him.) Nor was he primarily concerned with alleviating suffering. Rather, as described in his book Prescription Medicide, Kevorkian’s “ultimate aim” was a license to engage in human vivisection, i.e., “the performance of invaluable experiments or other beneficial medical acts under conditions that this first unpleasant step [assisted suicide] can help establish.”

The point of his ghoulish desire was pure quackery:

[K]nowledge about the essence of human death will of necessity require insight into the nature of the unique awareness of consciousness that characterizes cognitive human life. That is possible only throughobitiatric research [Kevorkian’s name for experimenting on people being euthanized] on living human bodies, and most likely centering on the nervous system… on anesthetized subjects [to] pinpoint the exact onset of extinction of an unknown cognitive mechanism that energizes life.
Good grief."

This is just the beginning of the article. Please read the entire article.

spectator.org/a-scourge-of-death-doctors/
30 Jan 2019 16:46 #37

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Replied by homeagain on topic Death with Dignity

homeagain wrote:

ramage wrote: "Altogether, well over a quarter of all deaths in 2017 in the Netherlands were induced."

Death on demand: has euthanasia gone too far? Countries around the world are making it easier to choose the time and manner of your death. But doctors in the world’s euthanasia capital are starting to worry about the consequences. By Christopher de Bellaigue
theguardian.com Jan 22, 2019


As an active member of Compassion and Choices (for several years now), I would like to correct your terminology. It is MEDICAL AID IN DYING (MAID)…...and it is a choice that an individual faces at the end of their life. When a medical condition is irreversible and death is the prognosis, I ADVOCATE to graciously go on my OWN TERMS. It is my body and my choice to exit in a manner that is peaceful and pain free. I never understood WHY
we elect to do this for our beloved fur babies, but not for our human loved ones. IT is legal
in Colorado and it has been an uphill, unnecessary struggle to find the medical assistance,
when YOUR RIGHT to exercise this exit has been passed into law.


www.deathwithdignity.org/learn/access/

THIS is comprehensive and makes it clear regarding your rights in Colorado.....
30 Jan 2019 18:05 #38

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Replied by ramage on topic Death with Dignity

What terminology are you correcting?
30 Jan 2019 19:02 #39

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Replied by ramage on topic Death with Dignity

National Review Feb 25, 2019
Wesley J. Smith

LAW & THE COURTS
Nevada Bill to Push Patients Off Wanted Life Support

By WESLEY J. SMITH
February 22, 2019 4:36 PM

Imagine your mother is in the hospital. She has written an advance medical directive instructing that her life be maintained even if things look very bleak. She has told you personally in an intense and intimate conversation, that she wants you to make sure everything is done to let her fight for her life.

A year later, your mother has a stroke and is fighting for life in an ICU. You try to do as she wanted, you instruct her doctors to maintain her life. But they say no. She is very unlikely to recover, and even if she does, she will be seriously disabled. Her “time” has come, they say. And then, they unilaterally remove her life support over your strenuous objections.

That kind of authoritarianism already happens in Texas and a few other states. Now, Nevada has a bill pending in the legislature that would permit doctors to push patients off wanted life-extending treatment. From SP 189:

A medical facility is not subject to disciplinary action, shall not be found to have violated any standard of care and is immune from civil and criminal liability for refusing to provide care or treatment requested by a patient at the medical facility, or by another person on behalf of such a patient, if a provider of health care:

1: Has determined that the treatment of care would not be effective or is contrary to reasonable medical standards.

This is a bioethics meme known as “medical futility,” “futile care,” “inappropriate care,” or “non-beneficial care” — the bioethicists are still working on the best lexicon to get their policy goals enacted.

The point of futile care is not to protect doctors from forced provision of treatment that isn’t working — sometimes called physiological futility. Rather, it is to enable doctors to stop treatment even though it is accomplishing what the patient wants, i.e., maintaining life. Here are some important points to ponder when considering this issue:

Futile care says maintaining life when the patients wants to stay alive is not an appropriate intervention in some cases.
Proclaiming treatment futile or inappropriate is a value judgment–not a medical determination — about whether the life in question is worth living, and/or worth paying to sustain. It essentially declares the patient futile.
Futile care decisions may be distorted by prejudice against disabled patients, the elderly, and other minorities.
Futile care involves collective decision-making that empowers strangers to make crucial decisions about a person’s life and death. It gives greater weight to institutional and professional values than to those of the patient and his or her family.
Futile care is a form of ad hoc health care rationing. That means an intervention considered futile in one hospital might not be in another.
25 Feb 2019 05:34 #40

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.405 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum
sponsors
© My Mountain Town (new)
Google+