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Death with Dignity

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ramage created the topic: Death with Dignity 20 Sep 2016 17:15 #1

The Dutch started with physician assisted suicide.

Now, medicalized killing boosters want to make sure that children ages 1-12 have a means of being killed, with a new children’s euthanasia center in the works. From the NLTimes story: Within the next year a center for euthanasia in children will open in the Netherlands, professor of pediatrics Eduard Verhagen predicted to Dutch newspaper AD, who calls him the authority in the field of child euthanasia. Under current Dutch legislation, euthanasia can be applied for infants up to a year old and kids over the age of 12, if they suffer unbearably. Kids between the ages of 1 and 12 years are considered incapable of making such an important decision for themselves and are not eligible for euthanasia. But according to Verhagen, doctors are already investigating the practice of life-end decisions for kids between the ages of 1 and 12 years. “We think that some children under the age of 12 are well able to make such important decisions”, he said.

Read more at: www.nationalreview.com/corner

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Rick replied the topic: Death with Dignity 21 Sep 2016 13:26 #2

ramage wrote: The Dutch started with physician assisted suicide.

Now, medicalized killing boosters want to make sure that children ages 1-12 have a means of being killed, with a new children’s euthanasia center in the works. From the NLTimes story: Within the next year a center for euthanasia in children will open in the Netherlands, professor of pediatrics Eduard Verhagen predicted to Dutch newspaper AD, who calls him the authority in the field of child euthanasia. Under current Dutch legislation, euthanasia can be applied for infants up to a year old and kids over the age of 12, if they suffer unbearably. Kids between the ages of 1 and 12 years are considered incapable of making such an important decision for themselves and are not eligible for euthanasia. But according to Verhagen, doctors are already investigating the practice of life-end decisions for kids between the ages of 1 and 12 years. “We think that some children under the age of 12 are well able to make such important decisions”, he said.

Read more at: www.nationalreview.com/corner

I'd like to see some of the individual cases where killing a child is deemed a reasonable act. It's ok to do before they are allowed to breath air but...

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ScienceChic replied the topic: Death with Dignity 25 Sep 2016 22:56 #3

There are genetic disorders that aren't caught by prenatal genetic testing that cause suffering and infant or toddler mortality. Though some parents, such as Ellie's , I'm sure would tell you that they are thrilled with the time they had with her, it is a very personal decision that each parent must make for themselves. Imagine if you were told that it was discovered at age 6 months that your child has a disorder that will cause her to suffer miserably before she will die by age 2...what would you choose? To let her suffer so you have more time with her and she can experience at least some life, or to prevent her from suffering unbearably? Should that be a decision made by her parents, or a government entity?

Just scratching the surface on infant mortality data...
Prevalence of Genetic Conditions / Birth Defects

Contribution of malformations and genetic disorders to mortality in a children's hospital.
Am J Med Genet A. 2004 May 1;126A(4):393-7.

Abstract

Malformations and genetic disorders are the leading cause of infant mortality in the US. Many malformations have a genetic basis due to genic, chromosomal, or multifactorial causation. We have studied the proportion of pediatric cases in a university-affiliated children's hospital that died of malformations and genetic disorders. We reviewed, retrospectively, deaths over a 4 year period (1994-1998) at Primary Children's Medical Center (PCMC), a university-affiliated tertiary children's referral hospital in Utah. The age at death and the cause of death were recorded for each case. We analyzed 523 cases; 180 (34.4%) deaths were due to malformations and genetic disorders. Of those 180, 30 (16.7%) had chromosome anomalies, 21 (11.7%) had a recognizable malformation syndrome, 118 (65.6%) had a malformation of unknown cause, and 11 (6.1%) had some other genetic disorder.

In addition, 51.0% patients (age <1 year) died of a malformation and/or genetic disorder. Genetic disorders and malformations are a substantial cause of mortality in a referral pediatric hospital. Knowledge of the impact of genetic diseases on mortality is important for the integration of preventive measures and health care strategies to care effectively for patients and their families. This information emphasizes the importance of further study of whether or not early recognition influences mortality rate and management.


Characteristics of deaths in paediatric intensive care: a 10-year study.
Nurs Crit Care. 2009 Sep-Oct;14(5):235-40. doi: 10.1111/j.1478-5153.2009.00348.x.

OBJECTIVE:
To describe the patient mortality over a 10-year period in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) including patient demographics, length of stay, cause and mode of death and to compare these findings with pre-existing literature from the western world.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:
Data recorded for each patient included patient demographics, length of stay and cause of death according to the International Classification of Disease-10 classification, and mode of death. Mode of death was assigned for each patient by placement in one of four categories: (i) brain death (BD), (ii) managed withdrawal of life-sustaining medical therapy (MWLSMT), (iii) failed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and (iv) limitation of treatment (LT). Over the study period, findings showed a median length of stay of 2 days (IQR 0-5 days), with a mortality rate of 5%. The most common mode of death was MWLSMT (n = 112, 54.9%) and this was consistent across the 10-year period. Linear regression analysis demonstrated no significant change in trend over the 10 years in each of the modes of death; BD (p = 0.84), MWLSMT (p = 0.88), CPR (p = 0.35) and LT (p = 0.67).

CONCLUSION:
End-of-life care is an important facet of paediatric intensive nursing/medicine. Ten years on from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health publication 'Withholding or withdrawing life sustaining treatment in children: A framework for practice', this study found managed withdrawal of MWLSMT to be the most commonly practised mode of death in a tertiary PICU, and this was consistent over the study period.


The hope of a secure and livable world lies with disciplined nonconformists who are dedicated to justice, peace and brotherhood. ~Martin Luther King, Jr.

Your scars exist, but it’s your courage that defines you. ~Nalini Singh

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ramage replied the topic: Death with Dignity 07 Oct 2016 06:35 #4

Rick,
Do you mean to say that it is acceptable to abort a child if it has not yet taken a breath?

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Rick replied the topic: Death with Dignity 11 Oct 2016 10:56 #5

ramage wrote: Rick,
Do you mean to say that it is acceptable to abort a child if it has not yet taken a breath?

No, if you've read my opinion on this before you know I was being sarcastic. According to a handful of unelected judges it was deemed acceptable to kill an unborn baby for any reason a woman sees fit. My point is that it wouldn't be a very big stretch to allow kids to kill themselves (especially if their lives are inconvenient for the parents). I think this world is devolving beyond repair.

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ramage replied the topic: Death with Dignity 11 Oct 2016 14:42 #6

Rick,
I was unaware of your prior posts that indicated you were being sarcastic. The question was asked for clarification, which you have given. I am in agreement with you. The proposition before the people of Colorado, regarding Assisted Suicide will, in time, lead to what you suggest. No one wants to ask Medical Doctors what they think of this proposal and what they plan to do if it is passed.
Example, a patient requests assisted suicide; the patient's personal physician does not think that it is appropriate. Will the doctor be forced by the State to accede to the request?

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ThuenteDL replied the topic: Death with Dignity 12 Oct 2016 19:23 #7

This would seem to be contrary to the hypocratic oath of do no harm. What kind of gyrations must a doctor go through to pretend they are not involved in harming someone?

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FredHayek replied the topic: Death with Dignity 13 Oct 2016 07:46 #8

Luckily Stephen Hawking didn't view life as just avoiding pain and suffering.


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ramage replied the topic: Death with Dignity 17 Oct 2016 09:46 #9

A poll of the Colorado Medical Society showed that 56% of their membership favored physician assisted suicide and 35% opposed it.
I do not know what the size of the sample was. See the complete article at cms..org.


Physician-assisted death: Polling shows a divided membership
Friday, May 20, 2016 10:28 AM Print this page E-mail this page
Deep differences exist among CMS members – including among those who are palliative medicine (PM) specialists and those with significant training in PM – on issues surrounding physician-assisted death, or PAD, though there are also areas of agreement. That’s what was revealed by a February 2016 survey of CMS members that focused on personal support/opposition to PAD, desired policy and the role for CMS in regard to efforts to legalize PAD in Colorado, concerns and priorities if a PAD law/ballot initiative passed in Colorado, and interest in enhanced end-of-life education for patients and physicians.

Overall, 56% of CMS members are in favor of “physician-assisted suicide, where adults in Colorado could obtain and use prescriptions from their physicians for self-administered, lethal doses of medications,” (including 31% “strongly”), while 35% are opposed (including 25% “strongly”).
Among those with at least some training in palliative medicine (42% of members overall), support stands at 56% (29% “strongly”) and opposition stands at 39% (29% “strongly”).
Among the somewhat narrower audience of those with at least “significant” training in PM (14% of members), support stands at 52% (including 24% “strongly”) and opposition stands at 41% (with 32% “strongly”).
Among those who “frequently” treat patients in later stages of a terminal disease, support stands at 50% (28% “strongly”) and opposition stands at 41% (32% “strongly”); among those who “sometimes” treat terminally ill patients, support is 51% (28% “strongly”) and opposition is 38% (27% “strongly”); among those who “rarely” or “never” treat such patients support is 65% (37% “strongly”) and opposition is 23% (18% “strongly”).
Physicians in Denver are considerably more supportive (62%-24%) than those in smaller cities in Colorado (49%-41%) and those in small towns or rural areas (48%-45%).
Those who are under 45 and those who are over 65 are most supportive (at 60% and 66%, respectively), while those 46-64 are less supportive (50%).

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FredHayek replied the topic: Death with Dignity 04 Nov 2016 08:53 #10

I wonder how much of this is already going on. My FIL was dying from cancer, reduced from 250lbs down to 110 in less than two months. On his final day, they doctors made the decision to let him have all the morphine he wanted. Technically he died of a heart attack connected to cancer, but I think it could also be called a physician assisted suicide combined with opiate overdose. And this was over twenty years ago.


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