Climate: Why I Believe, What It Would Take To Change My Mind

Replied by ScienceChic on topic Climate: Why I Believe, What It Would Take To Change My Mind

The latest IPCC Report came out 3 days ago. We have a small window, approximately 12 years, left to prevent the worst effects of global warming from being input permanently into our ecosystem. It's time for fundamental shifts in our way of life, mindsets, and actions and it's all do-able with the motivation and will-power of us all together. As Eric Holthaus says below, "the decade of the 2020s is about to be the most important years in all of humanity."

Links to the IPCC report and a couple of articles about it below.

"The day of the last big IPCC report—September 27, 2013—I gave up flying for good. Today, I'm committing to courage. The IPCC says we need to imagine and build an entirely different society between now and 2030, so I'm committing to my own personal 10-year plan to do just that.

Today's report is 1000 pages long, but there’s really just one main point to take away: Everyone and every idea is now a necessary part of the solution. We are all in this together. I’ve said that before, sure, but it feels visceral now, in the hours since this report’s release.

The report admits that “there is no documented historic precedent” for the scale of changes that would be necessary. Still, the world has briefly achieved such rapid change at regional levels during great crises — like post-WWII or rebounding from the energy crisis of the 1970s.

We’re about to enter one of the most creative, meaningful, transcendent eras of human history -- simply because we must. If you take the report literally -- which you should! -- the decade of the 2020s is about to be the most important years in all of humanity."

~Eric Holthaus
https://twitter.com/EricHolthaus/status/1049497413629685760

8 Things You Need to Know About the IPCC 1.5˚C Report
By Kelly Levin - October 07, 2018

While all countries committed under the Paris Agreement to limit global temperature rise to 1.5˚C-2˚C (2.7-3.6˚ F), major questions remained: How can the world achieve this temperature goal? And what happens if it doesn’t?

The world’s leading climate scientists, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), answered these questions and more in their latest report released today. Nearly 100 scientists analyzed how the world can achieve the 1.5˚C goal, as well as impacts associated with this rise in temperature.

Here are eight findings:

  1. Limiting warming to 1.5˚C requires major and immediate transformation.
  2. The scale of the required low-carbon transition is unprecedented.
  3. “Limiting warming to 1.5˚C” can mean different things—with different results.
  4. A 1.5˚C limit to warming is not safe for all…
  5. …but risks associated with warming are substantially lower at 1.5˚C than 2˚C.
  6. Emissions will need to reach net-zero around mid-century.
  7. All 1.5˚C emissions pathways rely upon carbon removal to some extent.
  8. Everyone – countries, cities, the private sector, individuals — will need to strengthen their action, without delay.

Turning Evidence into Action
There’s no sugarcoating it: Keeping warming to 1.5˚C will be hard. Really hard. But the IPCC report also makes it clear that the world has the scientific understanding, the technological capacity and the financial means to tackle climate change. Now what we need is the political will to precipitate the unprecedented concerted actions necessary to stabilize temperature rise below 1.5 C.


Five things we have learned from the IPCC report
By Matt McGrath, BBC Environment correspondent, Incheon, South Korea
8 October 2018

BBC environment correspondent Matt McGrath outlines five key takeaways from one of the most important reports on rising temperatures issued by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Their study, on the impacts and possible methods of keeping temperatures from warming by more than 1.5C, has just been launched in South Korea.

It is 'seriously alarming' but surprisingly hopeful


IPCC report Special Report 15
The hope of a secure and livable world lies with disciplined nonconformists who are dedicated to justice, peace and brotherhood. ~Martin Luther King, Jr.

The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it. ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is. ~Winston Churchill

Your scars exist, but it’s your courage that defines you. ~Nalini Singh
09 Oct 2018 10:02 #51

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Replied by Blazer Bob on topic Climate: Why I Believe, What It Would Take To Change My Mind

Last edit: 16 Feb 2019 10:20 by Blazer Bob.
16 Feb 2019 10:18 #52

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Replied by FredHayek on topic Climate: Why I Believe, What It Would Take To Change My Mind

I believe in global warming, but I also believe in freedom and capitalism more. It seems to me that most of the solutions being proposed are hugely expensive and limit my freedoms. Converting coal plants to natural gas is one solution that has brought down emissions and pollution and proved cheaper in the long run. Fracking, hated by the Enviros, has actually done a lot of good. Especially as Europe changes over from oil and coal power to natural gas.
Shutting down nuclear power in Germany and other places I think was a bad call. France still uses nuclear and has been selling their surplus to nations like Germany which invested too heavily into solar in a region that doesn't get much sun.
#35
16 Feb 2019 10:33 #53

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Replied by Rick on topic Climate: Why I Believe, What It Would Take To Change My Mind

Blazer Bob wrote:

Exaclty, or what the definition of a human life is. Damn science deniers lol.
16 Feb 2019 11:01 #54

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Replied by towermonkey on topic Climate: Why I Believe, What It Would Take To Change My Mind

Has the IPCC ever been right about one of their predictions? I mean without altering the data sets to make it appear that they were right of course.
16 Feb 2019 16:53 #55

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Replied by FredHayek on topic Climate: Why I Believe, What It Would Take To Change My Mind

towermonkey wrote: Has the IPCC ever been right about one of their predictions? I mean without altering the data sets to make it appear that they were right of course.

:like:
#35
17 Feb 2019 15:06 #56

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Replied by ScienceChic on topic Climate: Why I Believe, What It Would Take To Change My Mind

Yes.

Climate model projections compared to observations
RealClimate.org, 11 April 2017, last updated 07 Feb 2019

Since we have been periodically posting updates (e.g. 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, 2016) of model output comparisons to observations across a range of variables, we have now set up this page as a permanent placeholder for the most up-to-date comparisons. We include surface temperature projections from 1981, 1988, CMIP3, CMIP5, and satellite products (MSU) from CMIP5, and we will update this on an annual basis, or as new observational products become available. For each comparison, we note the last update date.

The hope of a secure and livable world lies with disciplined nonconformists who are dedicated to justice, peace and brotherhood. ~Martin Luther King, Jr.

The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it. ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is. ~Winston Churchill

Your scars exist, but it’s your courage that defines you. ~Nalini Singh
18 Feb 2019 21:59 #57

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Replied by towermonkey on topic Climate: Why I Believe, What It Would Take To Change My Mind

19 Feb 2019 05:26 #58

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Replied by Blazer Bob on topic Climate: Why I Believe, What It Would Take To Change My Mind

19 May 2019 08:48 #59
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Replied by FredHayek on topic Climate: Why I Believe, What It Would Take To Change My Mind

And then there is the other question. The US is limiting emissions. How do you make China and India limit theirs? Sanctions? If they can't sell goods here, they can shut down some of those polluting factories. And if their economy declines, they won't be using as many fossil fuels.
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19 May 2019 12:33 #60

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